Notable Slovenes

Žiga Zois, Man of the Enlightenment

Vladimir Bartol (1903-1967) published his novel Alamut in 1938. Set in northwestern Persia of 1092, it was intended to be a metaphor for Europe of his own time, providing insight into the rise of totalitarianism.

Yuri Venelin (1802-1839)

Yuriy Venelin: Ancient and Modern Slovenes

Vladimir Bartol (1903-1967) published his novel Alamut in 1938. Set in northwestern Persia of 1092, it was intended to be a metaphor for Europe of his own time, providing insight into the rise of totalitarianism.

Vladimir Bartol and his novel Alamut

Vladimir Bartol (1903-1967) published his novel Alamut in 1938. Set in northwestern Persia of 1092, it was intended to be a metaphor for Europe of his own time, providing insight into the rise of totalitarianism.

Maksim Gaspari: Self-portrait (1905) (lastna podoba)

Maksim Gaspari. Artist for the People

Maksim Gaspari, (1883 – 1980) Slovenian painter and illustrator has been and continues to be immensely popular in his homeland. His is a priceless cultural legacy to Slovenian people, embedded principally in a huge postcard collection. He had created a unique and distinct style, and a pictorial and artistic corpus of work portraying the people of rural Slovenia in the 19th century.

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Herman of Carinthia

Slovenian translator and polymath Herman of Carinthia was most probably born in Carinthia, the ancient…

Boris Pahor

The writer of the oppressed This year Boris Pahor, Slovenian writer living in Trieste (Italy)…

Jože Plečnik

The architectural legend of Slovenia Joze Plečnik (1872-1957) holds a special place in the history…

Baron Sigismund von Herberstein

An eminent diplomat of the Habsburg Empire in the 16th century, Sigismund (Žiga) von Herberstein (1486-1566) was the first to make use of his knowledge of Slovenian language in his diplomatic career and in research.

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