Jožko Šavli
Jožko Šavli

Jožko Šavli (1943-2011), was Slovenian author, freelance historian and professor of economics. He completed his university studies in 1967 at the University of Ljubljana, continued his studies in Vienna, and in 1975 completed a doctoral degree in social and economic sciences. From 1978 he taught Slovenian in the technical and commercial college in Gorica, Italy. However his true interest and love led him elsewhere – to the history of his nation. To this interest he dedicated all his time and energy ceaselessly, and with the passion of a true researcher.

As a historian, Jožko Šavli is the originator of the Venetic theory of Slovenian history, which has remained officially unrecognized. It offers however a refreshing alternative history of Slovenians, that proved to be exceptionally creative and fertile. It offered a new perspective for research and led to new discoveries about Slovenian past, such as Slovenian symbols, Slovenian saints, Slovenian nobility, enthronement of Slovenian dukes, and most significantly to insights about Slovenian mythology. This research was published in a comprehensive monograph Zlati cvet, Bajeslovje Slovencev (Golden Flower, Slovenian Mythology). Its sequel, monograph Zlata ptica (Golden Bird), was published in 2010.

Jožko Šavli continued the work of Slovenian ethnologists and collectors, such as Niko Kuret, Jakob Kelemina and others, and gave it a new meaning and perspectives. As it often happens, the full significance of Dr. Šavli’s work and achievements will be only fully appreciated and recognized by future generations.

Dogana

Dogana, the goddess of morning, also called Zora (dawn) personified the morning light. She represented the start of the working day, and the end of winter when days begin to lengthen. Her feast was Candlemas.

Vesna

Vesna, the goddess of spring is better known in other Slavic traditions. In Slovenian tradition this is expressed in festivity of Palm Sunday, Flower Sunday in Slovenian and symbolized in “butara,” the Easter sheaf.

Vodnar / Aquarius

There are few traces left of Vodnar, god of waters in Slovenian tradition, but he lives on in the folk tales as the water man, inhabiting the rivers and lakes of Slovenia, and as St. Christopher, the bread-giver.

Pust / Shrovetide Carnival

Pust of Slovenian tales is a Dyonisian figure, appearing in many folktales as the spirit of merriment and wine. The shrovetide festivity is called “pustovanje,”and it celebrates the winter’s end.

The Next World

Carantanians believed that there was a world where the departed dead go, deep underground. There is also an upper world, a beautiful garden, in the mountains, a metaphor for paradise.

Korant

Korant was god father of his people. His name can be traced back to the people called Carni and their land Korotan. Roman Noricum included him in its pantheon as Caruontanus.

Čatež

Čatež as described in Slovenian legends is identical with Greek Pan, and his double Roman Silvanus. In common with these deities Čatež is half man half goat, and has horns.

Zemlja

Frygian name Zemele means earth in Baltic and Slavic languages, the ground, the world. Its identification with the Greek Gaia has been preserved by Latvians as mother earth Žemyna

Vodin

God Vodin can be traced back to the Venetic people who had settled in Scandinavia. There are also traces of him elsewhere, particularly in pre-christian Caranthania, as the god 

Belin

Belin is an ancient deity. He succeeded the Great Spirit of the Age of Hunters and appeared as the highest god in the Age of Shepherds and Tillers. He manifested as